An old childhood favourite: ‘The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe’

For the past 3 years I have found time to reread this story and to share it with some of the young people I work with, and it never fails to draw me in as effectively as it did when I first read it as a child.

The story of Peter, Susan, Edmund and Lucy, and their adventures, is so well known that it’s really not necessary for me to summarise it here. Needless to say, the mixture of magic and adventure was exactly the sort of thing I enjoyed reading as a child (and even now) and despite some elements not aging well (the way the children speak at times,  the casual sexism shown by Father Christmas), the story itself never grows old.

I was asked today who my favourite character in the book was, and I had to say (after a little thinking) Mr Tumnus. He’s the first magical creature we meet and he shows us that sometimes good people can make mistakes. However, as he realises his mistake, he stands up for what is right.

A lovely, lovely story, and one I’m sure I will be enjoying for many years to come.

Enjoyable easy-read

Enjoyable easy-read

During the summer I always like to pick up a quick-read or two; something romantic and girly that doesn’t require any thinking whatsoever. I’ve read a few of Milly Johnson’s other books so when I saw ‘The Teashop on the Corner’ I thought I’d give it a go as one of my summer reads.

I actually read most of this on the train and it was perfect for that purpose – not so complex that the various distractions made me lose sense of the plot. It tells a similar story to a lot of her other books; it’s all about people finding second chances at happiness when they least expect it.

The story is at times over-contrived and highly improbable, and the attempts at describing banter over literature seem stilted and anything-but-natural but I enjoyed it and it even drew a tear from me at the end. It won’t be staying on my bookshelf in the long term, but it provided a welcome distraction for a few days.